Of Loquats & Larceny

Many visitors (and more than a few residents "from off") are no doubt wondering this week what EXACTLY are those orange bobbles festooning nearly every other tree in the Lowcountry right now. They're loquats of course, or Japanese plums. In the Lowcountry they're synonymous with the beginning of Spring proper. Though not native to the …

Reconciliation

Chef Kevin Mitchell Prepping for the 2015 Nat Fuller Feast of Reconciliation. 4 years ago I was blessed to be transported into the kitchen at McCrady's Restaurant. I’d volunteered in helping Chefs Sean Brock, Kevin Mitchell, the Leadership of the Culinary Institute of Charleston and a host of ridiculous talent in recreating an historic feast …

Palmetto Asparagus

(L) early 20th Century engraving of the famed Palmetto Asparagus.(R, Above) Monetta Farm's delicious Palmetto State asparagus. South Carolina became the leading grower of Asparagus in the late 19th & early 20th Century. South Carolina ALSO is responsible for introducing one of the most delicious varieties of the spring harbinger; the aptly named Palmetto. I …

An Ode to Green Garlic

“Provençal cooking is based on garlic. The air in Provence is impregnated with the aroma of garlic, which makes it very healthful to breathe. Garlic is the main seasoning in bouillabaisse and in the principal sauces of the region. A sort of mayonnaise is made with it by crushing it in oil, and this is …

The Eerie Bones of Fort Fremont

Think Mayan Tulum, the Forest Moon of Endor & The Planet of the Apes all bundled up. Why this hasn't been used as a filming location for a horror or sci-fi movie is beyond me. At first glance, Fort Fremont is such a creepy space. I'll admit the heebie jeebies never went away. (Perhaps due …

 A Remembrance of Restaurants Past (with apologies to Marcel Proust.)

I had ceased now to feel mediocre, accidental, mortal. Whence could it have come to me, this all-powerful joy? I was conscious that it was connected with the taste of tea and cake, but that it infinitely transcended those savours, could not, indeed, be of the same nature as theirs. Whence did it come? What …

O Rye The Hell Not?

The Wednesday New York Times included a fantastic article on a resurgence of rye, but failed to mention the restoration of Seashore Black Rye. The comments section was robust, and I weighed in accordingly: As a South Carolina Chef Ambassador, I'd be remiss if I didn't bring up the incredible Restoration efforts going on now throughout …

Christmas Day, 2016

Merry Christmas y'all; I've been away. As is so often the case with a new job, I've been down the rabbit hole working hard to build a world class team and culture. Many trials and tribulations, lots of fodder for new stories from Wild West of the F&B frontier. Among other things, I was tapped …

Remembering Verta Mae

I was saddened to learn of Verta Mae Grovenor's passing over the weekend. I wrote this post a year ago recalling the time my wife and I got to meet her at a Southern Foodways event at McCrady's. She was a Space Goddess!   I met a lady named Vertamae Smart- Grosvenor once at a …

Rock me Like a Hurricane

Everyone's heard about the devastation wrought by Hurricane Hugo in 1989, some of us remember it. As Hermine Matthew bears down on the Lowcountry, I wanted to touch base since many of us in F&B come from off and may not have ever experienced a hurricane. What to expect: In the event of a tropical …